Theories of Crime Causation - Research Papers - 1583 Words

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5 Individual Project CRJS105 1103b-04 Theories of Crime Causation October 26, 2011 Abstract...

Includes a critique of the lack of integration of individual and environmental explanatory approaches in criminology. Discusses what theories of crime causation should explain, as well as the importance of having a proper theory of action. The initial outline of key causal factors and processes in the explanation of crime according to SAT are outlined.

Theories of Crime Causation - Term Papers - 1634 Words

Describe the biological theories of crime causation and their policy implications. Wikström, Per-Olof. 2004. Crime as alternative: Towards a cross-level situational action theory of crime causation. In Beyond empiricism: Institutions and intentions in the study of crime. Edited by Joan McCord, 1–37. Advances in Criminological Theory 13. New Brunswick, NY: Transaction.

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Theories of Crime Causation | Day One


The theory of crime causationELAINE WILSON11/25/2011D. COOPERUNIT 3 INDIVIDUAL PROJECTThe social control theory is just what the name says; it is theory...Wikström, P-O H., 2004. Crime as alternative: Towards a cross-level situational action theory of crime causation. In: J. McCord, ed. Beyond empiricism: Institutions and intentions in the study of crime. Advances in Criminological Theory, Volume 13. New Brunswick: Transaction, pp.1-37.Theories of Crime Causation: Unit 3 Individual ProjectJimmie O'NealAIU OnlineTheories of Crime Causation: Unit 3 Individual ProjectThere are a few...Introduction
Joan McCord
1. Crime as Alternative: Towards a Cross-Level Situational
Action Theory of Crime Causation
Per-Olof H. Wikström
2. Punishing Serious Juvenile Offenders: Crime,
Racial Disparity, and the Incarceration of Adolescents
in Adult Prison in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-
Century Pennsylvania
David Wolcott and Steven Schlossman
3. Toward a Theory of Public/Private Interaction
in Policing
Peter Grabosky
4. “Institutionalizing” Criminological Theory
Steven F. Messner and Richard Rosenfeld
5. The Functional Neuroanatomy and Psycho-
pharmacology of Predatory and Defensive Aggression
Jordan B. Peterson and Matthew S. Shane
6. Toward a Theory of Criminal Responsibility
Joan McCord
About the Authors
Index With this background in mind, attempting to identify an appropriate theory of crime causation which might explain Dahmer's behavior is somewhat challenging. Akers and Sellers (2004) state that early biological theories suggesting that criminals have inborn abnormalities which are revealed through physical traits have largely been debunked. Newer biological theories focus on brain functioning, neurology, biochemistry, and genetics as explanatory factors. However, Akers and Sellers (2004) take the position that these theories of crime are somewhat limited because not all males with high levels of testosterone are excessively aggressive and many offenders who are aggressive do not have higher than normal testosterone levels.Theoretical requirements. Ideally, a theory that explains social behavior in general, or a specific kind of social behavior like crime, should deal with both the individual conduct and the epidemiology involved (Cressey 1960). Thus, in a theory of crime causation, there should be a statement that explains the statistical distribution of criminal behavior in time and space (its epidemiology) and that can be used to derive predictive statements about unknown statistical distributions. But the same theory also should be concerned with criminality and should identify, at least by implication, the processes by which individuals come to exhibit criminality and from which can be derived predictive statements about the behavior of individuals. We shall review the principal theories that attempt, in varying degrees, to integrate explanation of the epidemiology of crime with explanation of individual criminality. This arbitrary limitation eliminates from our immediate concern the older biological theories, which held that individual criminality is inherited or caused by nonhereditary biological conditions. It also eliminates from consideration those theories of crime that are based on economic or cultural determinism and that, therefore, have only slight implications for explanation of the behavior of individual criminals.