Does Abortion Prevent Crime? - Slate Magazine

In 1966, Romania outlawed abortion in order to create massive population growth. The birth rate of the country doubled, as did unwanted children and associated crime. On the other hand, in 1973 the Supreme Court legalized abortion in the U.S. after the Rowe vs Wade decision. 20 years after Rowe vs. Wade would have been the early 1990’s. Levitt believes that these unwanted children weren’t born, lowering the crime rate here in the U.S. He views the U.S. and Romania as a natural experiment to show the effect of abortion on crime rates.

Crime Abortion Crime Rates Criminal Activity Law School Economists Decrease Wade Sharp Peak

Lastly, it must be noted that few of our results are robust to different specifications and samples. For example, the significant negative correlation between abortion and crime rates in the exogenous models does not hold for some sub-categories (e.g. violent and sex crimes) and is not robust to some other specifications (excluding London, area-specific trends and first-difference estimation).

Abortions and Crime: Freakonomics Movie - YouTube

In 2001 an article was published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics in which the authors argued that legalized abortion reduces crime rates. In 2001 an article was published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics in which the authors argued that legalized abortion reduces crime rates. The authors, economists John Dubner and Steven Levitt, examined the decrease in crime in the United States since the early 1990s and attribute it in large part to the legalization of abortion in 1973. The article immediately invoked heated debate, particularly because of its moral, social and political implications. Levitt later published the findings on the abortion-crime theory to a much broader audience in a chapter of his New York Times Bestseller, Freakonomics, which he coauthored with New York journalist Stephen J. Dubner. Freakonomics made the abortion-crime theory well-known and widely accepted among non-academics because of the simple commonsense way in which Levitt and Dubner presented their arguments and evidence. Although the book, and, consequently, the theory on abortion and crime, gained much popularity, many of the criticisms of the abortion-crime theory have gone unnoticed, leaving the general public with the sense that Levitt and Donohue’s original theory is indisputable. However, serious criticisms of the theory - many from highly acclaimed economists and academics - are numerous and, at best, cast much doubt on Levitt and Donohue’s findings if not discredit them all together.

Abortion and the Crime Rate - Wright State University

Some recent work has cast doubt on the direction and statistical significance of D&L’s estimates of the marginal impact of abortion rates on crime rates. Similarly, the estimated impact of abortion for England and Wales is extremely sensitive to both the specification of the statistical model and the choice of crime dataset. These caveats notwithstanding, it is interesting to speculate why abortion and crime rates may be negatively related even if the legalisation of abortion itself does not reduce crime.

New York Times August 20, 1999 Roe v


Some recent work has cast doubt on the direction and statistical significance of D&L’s estimates of the marginal impact of abortion rates on crime rates.[3] Similarly, the estimated impact of abortion for England and Wales is extremely sensitive to both the specification of the statistical model and the choice of crime dataset. These caveats notwithstanding, it is interesting to speculate why abortion and crime rates may be negatively related even if the legalisation of abortion itself does not reduce crime.In 2001 an article was published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics in which the authors argued that legalized abortion reduces crime rates. The authors, economists John Dubner and Steven Levitt, examined the decrease in crime in the United States since the early 1990s and attribute it in large part to the legalization of abortion in 1973. The article immediately invoked heated debate, particularly because of its moral, social and political implications. Levitt later published the findings on the abortion-crime theory to a much broader audience in a chapter of his New York Times Bestseller, Freakonomics, which he coauthored with New York journalist Stephen J. Dubner. Freakonomics made the abortion-crime theory well-known and widely accepted among non-academics because of the simple commonsense way in which Levitt and Dubner presented their arguments and evidence. Although the book, and, consequently, the theory on abortion and crime, gained much popularity, many of the criticisms of the abortion-crime theory have gone unnoticed, leaving the general public with the sense that Levitt and Donohue’s original theory is indisputable. However, serious criticisms of the theory - many from highly acclaimed economists and academics - are numerous and, at best, cast much doubt on Levitt and Donohue’s findings if not discredit them all together.